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Superconducting hydrogen?

January 25, 2010
biotech

[NEWS] Contact: Dave Mao h.mao@gl.ciw.edu 202-478-8960 Carnegie Institution Washington, D.C. – Physicists have long wondered whether hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe, could be transformed into a metal and possibly even a superconductor – the elusive state in which electrons can flow without resistance. They have speculated that under cer…


How ‘random’ lasers work

January 24, 2010
biotech

[NEWS]

Contact: Lee Siegel leesiegel@ucomm.utah.edu 801-581-8993 University of Utah Natural cavities act like mirrors in light-emitting plastics SALT LAKE CITY, Jan. 24, 2010 – When University of Utah scientists discovered a new kind of laser that was generated by an electrically conducting plastic or polymer, no…


Neuron connections seen in 3-D

January 22, 2010
biotech

[NEWS]

Contact: SINC info@plataformasinc.es 34-914-251-820 FECYT – Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, in Germany, led by the Spanish physicist Rubén Fernández-Busnadiego, has managed to obtain 3D images of the vesicles and filaments involved in co…


Florida invests $1.5 billion in Biotechnology

January 21, 2010
biotech

Florida taxpayers have spent more than $1.5 billion to turn the state into a biotech hub, but the payoff remains …Click Here to Read More


Railways and slime moulds: A life of slime

January 21, 2010
biotech

Network-engineering problems can be solved by surprisingly simple creatures

FROM adhesives that mimic the feet of geckos to swimsuits modelled on shark skin, biologically inspired design has taken off in recent times. Copying nature’s ideas allows people to harness the power of evolution to come up with clever products. Now a group of researchers has taken this idea a step further by using an entire living organism—a slime mould—to solve a complex problem. In this case, the challenge was to design an efficient rail network for the city of Tokyo and its outlying towns.

Slime moulds are unusual critters—neither animal, nor plant nor fungus. If they resemble anything, it is a colonial amoeba. Physarum polycephalum, the species in question, consists of a membrane-bound bag of protoplasm and, unusually, multiple nuclei. It can be found migrating across the floor of dark, damp, northern-temperate woodlands in search of food such as bacteria. It can grow into networks with a diameter of 25cm. …

Bioinformatics: Binary answers to biological questions

January 19, 2010
biotech

At the crossroads of biology, computer science and information technology is the fast-growing, game-changing field of bioinformatics. Fast-growing because scientists …Click Here to Read More


Transplanted stem cells form proper brain connections

January 19, 2010
biotech

[NEWS]

Contact: Kat Snodgrass ksnodgrass@sfn.org 202-962-4090 Society for Neuroscience In new animal study, neurons developed from stem cells successfully wired with other brain regions Washington, DC – Transplanted neurons grown from embryonic stem cells can fully integrate into the brains of young animals, ac…


New nanoparticles target cardiovascular disease

January 18, 2010
biotech

[NEWS] Contact: Jen Hirsch jfhirsch@mit.edu 617-253-1682 Massachusetts Institute of Technology Could potentially eliminate need for arterial stents in some patients CAMBRIDGE, Mass. – Researchers at MIT and Harvard Medical School have built targeted nanoparticles that can cling to artery walls and slowly release medici…


First successful use of expanded umbilical-cord blood units to treat leukemia

January 17, 2010
biotech

[NEWS] Contact: Dean Forbes dforbes@fhcrc.org 206-667-2896 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center SEATTLE – Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have cleared a major technical hurdle to making umbilical-cord-blood transplants a more widely-used method for treating leukemia and other blood cancers. In a study published in the Jan…


Harnessing the divas of the nanoworld

January 15, 2010
biotech

[NEWS] Contact: Marcia Goodrich mlgoodri@mtu.edu 906-487-2343 Michigan Technological University Michigan Tech scientist grows nano-fields of BNNTs Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are the divas of the nanoworld. In possession of alluring properties, they are also notoriously temperamental compared to their carbon-based cousins. …