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Orange Peels, Newspapers May Lead to Cheaper, Cleaner Ethanol Fuel

February 21, 2010
biotech

University of Central Florida professor Henry Daniell has developed a groundbreaking way to produce ethanol from waste products such as …Click Here to Read More


Perry Center for Emerging Technologies open house

February 21, 2010
alachua

Santa Fe College’s new Perry Center for Emerging Technologies in Alachua is sponsoring an open house from 6:30 to 7:30 …Click Here to Read More


US broadens definition of stem cell

February 19, 2010
biotech

The U.S. government broadened the definition of a human embryonic stem cell on Friday, helping qualify several corporate and academic experiments …Click Here to Read More


How many people with a personal genome sequence walk the earth today?

February 19, 2010
biotech

The GET Conference 2010 marks the last chance in history to collect everyone with a personal genome sequence on the …Click Here to Read More


BioFlorida launches foundation to promote education, collaboration

February 19, 2010
biotech

BioFlorida, the statewide trade association founded in 1997 to advance Florida’s bioscience industry, has approved a plan to launch The …Click Here to Read More


More, better biodiesel

February 19, 2010
biotech

[NEWS]

Contact: Andy Fell ahfell@ucdavis.edu 530-752-4533 University of California – Davis Yields of biodiesel from oilseed crops such as safflower could be increased by up to 24 percent using a new process developed by chemists at UC Davis. The method converts both plant oils and carbohydrates into biodiesel in a single process, and should also impr…


Printing body parts: Making a bit of me

February 18, 2010
biotech

A machine that prints organs is coming to market

THE great hope of transplant surgeons is that they will, one day, be able to order replacement body parts on demand. At the moment, a patient may wait months, sometimes years, for an organ from a suitable donor. During that time his condition may worsen. He may even die. The ability to make organs as they are needed would not only relieve suffering but also save lives. And that possibility may be closer with the arrival of the first commercial 3D bio-printer for manufacturing human tissue and organs.

The new machine, which costs around $200,000, has been developed by Organovo, a company in San Diego that specialises in regenerative medicine, and Invetech, an engineering and automation firm in Melbourne, Australia. One of Organovo’s founders, Gabor Forgacs of the University of Missouri, developed the prototype on which the new 3D bio-printer is based. The first production models will soon be delivered to research groups which, like Dr Forgacs’s, are studying ways to produce tissue and organs for repair and replacement. At present much of this work is done by hand or by adapting existing instruments and devices. …


Transforming skin cells into stem cells using a molecular toolkit

February 18, 2010
biotech

[NEWS] Contact: Michael Bernstein m_bernstein@acs.org 202-872-6042 American Chemical Society In an effort to sidestep the ethical dilemma involved in using human embryonic stem cells to treat diseases, scientists are developing non-controversial alternatives: In particular, they are looking for drug-like chemical compounds that can transform adult skin …


Genes, environment, or chance?

February 18, 2010
biotech

[NEWS] Contact: Scott Rifkin scinews@ucsd.edu University of California – San Diego Biologists attribute variations among individual organisms to differences in genes or environment, or both. But a new study of nematode worms with identical genes, raised in identical environments, has revealed another factor: chance. It’s another source of variation …


Biologists discover how biological clock controls cell division in bacteria

February 18, 2010
biotech

[NEWS] Contact: Kim McDonald kmcdonald@ucsd.edu 858-534-7572 University of California – San Diego A team of biologists has unraveled the biochemistry of how bacteria so precisely time cell division, a key element in understanding how all organisms from bacteria to humans use their biological clocks to control basic cellular functions. The discove…