Quantcast

Luminescent markers are an indispensable tool for researchers working with DNA. But the markers are troublesome. Some tend to destroy the function and structure of DNA when inserted. Others emit so little light, that they can barely be detected in the hereditary material. So researchers have been asking for alternative markers.

Now a PhD student at the University of Copenhagen has developed a tool in collaboration with researchers at Chalmers Technical University, which might save both problems: A tool that you might call a molecular gauge.

PhD student Soren Preus has investigated the properties of the two luminescent so called DNA base analogues tCO and tCnitro trying to determine whether they could measure the structure of DNA without disrupting it. His scrutiny has shown that the function of DNA is unimpeded by the insertion of the molecular gauge. And even better: One base analogue is very efficient at emitting light, and the other very good at receiving it. And because you can provoke transport of light-energy between the two luminescent markers they are usable for a measuring technique known as FRET or Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*